LETTER TO HISTORIC ENGLAND

Dear Nick,

I write hoping that you may be able to advise on a tricky situation regarding Baguley Hall, As you are aware it is now nearly three years since HTNW were supposedly given the OK to take over the ownership of the Hall by the then Culture Secretary.

Well, despite enquiries to John (no response whatsoever) and yourself and to Historic England we appear to be no further on! Due diligence was, carried out on Heritage Trust NW but they appear to have gone very quiet, indeed if you check their website they have never mentioned Baguley Hall and neither have EH! As Friends of Baguley Hall we could have been up and running if not actually with the Hall restored and fully utilised but with a full mobilised corps of volunteers working to raise funds in the community and applying for lottery money but because of no or very vague information provided (EH say “its taking time to formulate plans” and we have heard nothing from John Miller of HTNW) We are left in the situation where there is no point in holding even an inaugural meeting for our group and I am left just trying to keep interest alive with Facebook, Google+ and a website presence and this is an unsustainable situation in the long term. We have a considerable constituency of 500 regulars on Facebook, Nearly 40,000 views on Google+ and if this isn’t an indication of interest in BH then I don’t know what is. I regularly deal with enquiries about the hall from all over the world, Even Africa and the Middle East Baguley Hall is a much-loved, internationally known building. Now I come on to the wasted opportunities for Baguley where the Hall could have been a significant Icon of Regeneration for an area that needs a central location for Community Use. Can we please have a Statement of Work done so far and clarification of the exact role of Heritage Trust North West in the future of the Hall, if anything, they appear to be decreasing the number of projects they are working on if their ‘bare-bones’ website is to be taken as read.

Whilst we appreciate your help organising the Friend’s Visits over the last two years, which have been a great success, I’m sure you would agree that this is hardly going to be enough moving forward. Speaking to other Friends a consensus is forming that unless positive news is forthcoming soon then we should maybe look at publicising the increasingly frustrating lack of news and failure to even liaise with us, as the best friends our beautiful old hall will ever have (and let’s face it, We are the people who will make up the Hall’s future volunteer corps!) perhaps, we should set ourselves up as a more professional BPT Charity and attempt to convince yourselves plus DCMS that FOBH would be a more pro-active and open management team for Baguley Hall. With our enthusiasm, diligence and ideas for the Hall we could have at least been on the brink of becoming revenue self-sufficient in the daily operations of the Hall by now. I had built relationships with local business partners Wythenshawe Community Housing Trust, Locality, Manchester Airport Group and had planned that Baguley Hall be included on the World Monuments Fund Watch list 2016 but all this has had to go into abeyance with little to show by way of work or even plans for future work. The Hall has had 70 years of indifference and neglect. We, as The Friends of Baguley Hall, feel we cannot let this go on any longer without some form of protest. Please can we have a meeting so that perhaps some of these concerns can be addressed? Yours, Mathew Hopkins Chairman -Friends of Baguley Hall Professor Michael Wood Professor for The Public Understanding of History University of Manchester Mike Kane MP MP for Wythenshawe and Sale East NOTE: A meeting between FOBH and HE has been arranged for 17 March at BH, attending will be Nick Hill and Catherine Dewar for HE; Myself. Pam Cohen and Prof Michael Wood for FOBH

THE DESCENDANTS OF BAGGELEGH. THE LAST STUART MONARCHS

 

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Sir Edward Hyde 1st Duke of Clarendon, King Charles I’s First Minister and father of King James II’s first wife Anne Hyde. Clarendon was grandfather of the last two Stuart Queens of England Queen Mary II and Queen Anne.
Thomas Middleton. Annals of Hyde and district : containing historical reminiscences of Denton, Haughton, Dukinfield, Mottram, Longdendale, Bredbury, Marple, and the neighbouring townships.

deep and wide ; the appearance and noise of this cascade have a
romantic effect, and the river below, for half a mile, is made to
appear like a lake, forming a fine piece of water well stocked with
trout and eels. On each side of the river downwards from the
gardens, are high banks well wooded, in which the river is lost for
some space and then seen again.”

Such descriptions would scarcely apply to the present aspect of the valley. The old hall is gone not a trace of it remains ; its antiquities have vanished with it ; not a stone of the old
corn mill is left ; the river has played sad havoc with the weir ; the stately woods have died out slowly, and the trout and eels have disappeared. It seems a big price to pay for our modern
conveniences when a few years of so-called progress can bring about so great a transformation.

Little of an authentic character can be said respecting the early history of Hyde Hall. Like most other manor houses in its vicinity it was evidently the successor of an earlier structure
built upon the same site. Old chronicles show the family of Hydes to have been settled here from a very early date, and it is only reasonable to suppose that they dwelt in a house suitable
to their rank and position. There are traditions which claim that one Lord Matthew de Hyde erected a castle in these parts as far back as the 12th century.

The hall appears to have been built in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, and to have been re-built about the time of the Restoration. It continued to be the residence of the manorial lords of Hyde, until it was disposed of to the Fultons, of Fulton, in
Lancashire. It was demolished in the year 1857.

Local chroniclers have woven around the venerable building much that is highly romantic. It is said that the lords of themanor of Hyde lived here in the fine old English style, dispersing their hospitality in a regal manner, holding ” brilliant
entertainments ” and ” courtly ” family
gatherings. It is also a popular rumour that Queen Anne first saw light in Hyde Hall, and it is claimed as a fact that the two princesses of James II. frequently came down to the hall, on long visits to their relatives at Hyde. However that may be, it is beyond all dispute that the family of Hyde is of great antiquity and corresponding fame.

ARMS OF HYDE.

Arms : Azure, a chevron between three lozenges ; Or Crest : A raven or crow, wings elevated, sable (sometimes depicted as an eagle or a hawk).

Soon after the doomsday the township belonged to the Baggeleghs, who were styled “Lords of Baguley and Hyde,” but as early as the days of King John, we find one moiety in the possession of a family bearing the local name De Hyde.
Sir William de Baggelegh, who was living in the early part of the 14th century, left (on the death of his son John de Baggelegh without issue) his two daughters as co-heiresses. One of these,
Ellen, married Sir John Legh, of Booths, ancestor of the Leghs of Baguley and Adlington ; the other, named Isabella, as shown later, married John de Hyde, of Hyde and Norbury, whose descendants succeeded to a moiety or half the manor of Hyde. It appears from an inquisition that this moiety was held under the Leghs of Baguley.

Matthew de Hyde, who lived in the 12th century, and who is thought by some to have been descended from the De Bromales, seems to have been the first Lord of the house of Hyde. He had
issue a son, Robert de Hyde, frequently referred to as Sir Robert, who married the heiress of Thomas de Norbury, and thus acquired the manor of Norbury, Newton, and other lands in
Derbyshire. This Robert is described as ” Lord of half of Hyde, and of Newton or part thereof, in Cheshire ; Shalecross and Fernely in Derbyshire, and Haughton and Denton, in Lancashire.

Some authorities imagine it was the Robert of the next generation son of the above Robert who formed the Union with the heiress of the Norburys, but Ormerod is inclined to
believe that it was the father who contracted the marriage. There is the greater likelihood of this being so, as the second Robert certainly married Margery, whose father, Sir Robert de Stokeport, gave to ” Robert, son of Robert de Hyde, in frank
marriage with her,” lands in Bredbury. Sometime near the end of the reign of Henry III., the son of the above Sir Robert de Stokeport exchanged certain lands in Romelegh, with Robert de
Hyde, for these frank marriage lands. Moreover, according to Ormerod though Earwaker has a note disputing this the second Robert seems to have married as a first or second wife, Alice de
Hyde, daughter of William, son of Elias de Hyde, and he would also appear to have had an elder brother John, who as son of ” Agnes de Herdisle, cousin and heiress of Thomas de Norbury, quit
claims to Robert his right in Norbury, Newton, and half of Hyde.”

Robert de Hyde, who witnessed the Stockport charter, was succeeded by his eldest son, Sir Robert de Hyde, who married Margery, daughter of Sir Robert de Stokeport, and was the father
of two sons, John and Alexander. The first-born, known as John del Hyde, succeeded to the estates, and Alexander became the progenitor of the Hydes of Denton, settling on an estate which his father had given him on the Lancashire side of the river Tame. This same Alexander had grants from his brother of all the latter’s lands in Romiley and Denton.

John del Hyde obtained, by fine, of Robert, son of Richard de Dewsnap and Hawis his wife, 17 acres in Hyde, In the reign of Edward II. he is found obtaining by fine, of William de Ruylegh,
Chaplain, the manor of Norbury, and the other moiety of the manor of Hyde. He married as his second wife Isabella, daughter of Sir William de Baggelegh, and in connection with the union
the following passage is found in the Hyde deeds:

” I, William,
lord of Baguley, have given to John de Hyde in frank marriage with Isabella my daughter, and to heirs of their bodies, a weir for their mills in Halghton upon the river Tame, whenever they chose to make it within the boundaries of Hyde.”

From the union with Isabel Baggelegh there was issue John de Hyde, who was knighted before 1353. He served with the Black Prince in the wars of the period, and was engaged, under the banners of the Earl of Chester, fighting the cause of England at the battle of Poictiers in 1356, when John, the King of France, was made prisoner of war. Sir John Hyde is chronicled as having led seventy-one archers to the king’s wars. This warrior married (either Margery, daughter of Sir Thomas de Davenport, of Wheltrough, or as some give it, Margaret, daughter of Sir John de Davenport), and through his fourth son Ralph, became the ancestor of the Hydes of Urmston. He sold his interests in the manors and lands of Shallcrosse, Godlegh, Newton, Fernelegh, Heigham, and Heiton.

After the death of Sir John Hyde the lands and manorial rights of Hyde passed to his third son, Eobert de Hyde. Robert was heir to his brother William, the second son, who in turn was
most probably heir to the eldest son Roger. William is thought to have married the daughter and heiress of Sir John Davenport, of Bramhall, and most likely died without surviving issue, hence the succession devolved on the third son Robert.

Robert de Hyde appointed Thomas de Stavelegh, of Staveley, as his attorney for his manors of Norbury and half of Hyde. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Robert de Stavelegh, and had a
son Robert de Huyde, so styled in the spelling of the day, who was wounded at Nether Alderley. This Robert de Huyde was followed by his son, John de Hyde, lord of Norbury in the time
of Henry VI.

John de Hyde married Matild, daughter of Hamon de Masci, of Rixon.

Their heir was Hamon or Hamnet Hyde, of Norbury and Hyde, who died before 1476, and was eventually succeeded by his second son, Thomas Huyde heir to the elder brother John.
Thomas married a daughter of Kniveton, of Underwood. He was exempted from serving on juries, August, 1511. In 1542, we find Robert de Hyde, the son of Thomas, in possession.

Robert de Hyde was thrice married, first to Margaret, the daughter of Richard Holland, of Denton, by whom he had twosons, Hamnet and John during the reign of Edward VI
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13th to 14th Centuries in Northern Bucklow (inc The Black Death)

Edw 2nd-3rdblack_death

). Sir Hamon de Massey, Lord of Backford & Tymperley. d.1349 – Descended from Robert de Massey of Sale, brother to Baron Hamon de Massey 3rd. The line of Robert de Massey of Sale follows with Robert, then Richard, then Sir Hamon de Massey of Backford & Tymperley. Sir Hamon (Hugh) of Tymperley held this Moiety by Grant of Hugh de Massey of Tatton (Edw 2nd) & was deemed an appendage of the Manor of Dunham. Sir Hamon of Tymperley could be confused with Baron Hamon de Massey V1 as both were alive at the same time. Both Moieties of Backford & Tymperley were held by the earliest Barons before passing to Robert de Massey.

1308-1309 Hamon de Mascy (The 6th Baron), to SETTLE the Manors of Dunham Massey, Bidstone, Saughall, Bateford-?(no such ancient place-spelling Backford), Kelsall on himself & the HEIRS MALE of his body, with remainder to Robert de Holand & his heirs, retaining the manors of Hale, Altringham, the sixth part of Partington and a house in Marton, Chester.

1310 Roger de Keneworthey ( ) Transfer of Estate Witness

1310 Adam de Northenden (Son of Hamon de Northenden Grant to Henry is brother
1313 Bond from Hamon de Kenewrthy of 40 shillings to William de Baggley for his Service & Allegiance to his Knights Liege. (Translator- Agra)

A Medieval Bond in a Subinfeudation is usually a form of security in respect of the land. See”Medieval usury and the commercialization of feudal bonds By Shael Herman”.
I
n this translation, Hamon de Kenewrthy has to pay a Service & Allegiance to Sir William de Baggelegh (Knight) to the sum of 40 shillings for the Moiety of all his own lands & property in Northenden & Kenworthy. The Bond means Hamon was a Feudal Vassal to his Liege Lord & in feudal terms bound to his King, Baron & Knight – Edw 2nd, Baron Massey V1 & Sir William de Baggelegh. Hamon Seals his Bond with the payment described & token rent of a nominal halfpenny for life as Seisin (possession) for Sir William.

1314-1315 About 10% of the Population die through poor health over 2 years as heavy rains in 1314 ruin the harvests. The Scots invade & in 1315, riots break out in Lancaster’s Northern Estates & Adam Banastre sacked Manchester! Prices crash for wool & cattle starve. The English Crown clamour for grain from Gascony! Grain & wine imports from Gascony (English since 1303) saved Paris from succumbing fully to the famine conditions. The conditions in Manchester were not good, but Gascony had rich farmers from the urgent sale of grain & wine. Corruption was rife & it was dangerous to be a Merchant!

1316 Thomas De Mascy of Wythenshaw. Land granted by Thomas to William his son & also neighbour William Baggelegh (One Witness is Roger de Keneworthy. Ormerod)

1316 Hamon de Massey V1 & 3rd wife Joan sign the reversion of the Dunham Estate on their future death to Oliver de Ingham. The Hamon heir has returned to Gascony & died there some time earlier, just before his Fathers Annulment & Marriage to Joan!

1316 (Oct) Henry de Northenden- Grant by Henry (Son of Hamon de Northenden) to Geoffrey the son of William de Baggelegh

1317 (April) Roger de Keneworthy- Grant by Roger (Son of Hamon de Kenworthy) to Geoffrey the son of William de Baggelegh

1332 Mathilda (widow of Henry de Northenden, Son of Hamon de Northenden. Quitclaim to William de Baggelegh.

1339. Hamon de Massey, V1 Baron of Dunham Massey & wife Joan pardoned (in retrospect?) for trespass in assarting without license 6 acres of heath in Kelsall.

1341. Hamon de Massey, V1 Baron of Dunham Massey, died. (15 Edw 3rd. v1. p522.) –

1348 Thomas de Massey:- Land granted in Northenden to son William, witness Robert de Tatton.

1348-1349 & 6 more times until 1400 (About 1.5m or 37% of the Population, mainly land dwellers died)

1353 John de Kenworthey (Son of Roger) Transfer of Estate Witness

1360 Peel Hall built, Manor House for Etchells, Wythenshawe. Dower House for the widow of Robert Tatton who inherited in 1578. Not to be confused with Peel Estates, Lancs.

1370 Robert de Tatton, Grandson of Robert de Tatton of Tatton (1297) acquires Wythenshawe.

1371 Robert de Tatton, Grandson of Robert de Tatton of Tatton (1297) marries Alice Massey, surviving heiress of the Masseys of Wythenshaw & inherits Massey estates.

1377-1399 –Richard 2nd. Bond for Robert de Tatton of Keneworthay, William de Tatton de Keneworthay & William de Keneworthay bound to Thme de Leghde Northenden.

1389 William de Kenworthey (Son of John).(see above spelling, clearly the same person). Mentioned in the Local Taxation rolls.

1391 William de Kenworthey (Son of John) Transfer of Estate Witness

1422-1471 During Henry V1 – James Kenworthay – Witness to Quit Claim for property rights in Northenden.
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DE MASSCEY/MASSEY ANCESTORS OF SIR WILLIAM DE BAGGELEGH

My premise is that ‘de mascey’ and ‘de baggelegh’ are homonymic names (denoting the surname or used to signal that the person controls/owns that area,

Ie de la ferte mace/de mascey/de baggelegh
Meaning of Ferte Mace becomes the anglicized Mascey/Massey, Sir William De Baggelegh son-in-law of Hamon de Masscey VI
1. Viscount William de la Ferté-Macé,1 2 3 4 son of William I Talvas, Lord of Bellême and Alençon and Hildegarde de Beaumont, was born in 1034 in Massey, <Cheshire, > England and died <1066> at age 32. Other names for William were William Lord of La Ferté-Macé, William Count de la Ferté-Macé, Viscount William de la Ferté Macé, William Ferte Massey, and William de la Ferté-Macé.
Birth Notes: May have been born in Normandy.

Death Notes: May have died at the Battle of Hastings.

Research Notes: Fought in Battle of Hastings with wife’s half brother, William the conqueror, his brothers-in-law, and his sons. Some sources list his sons as Hamon de Massey I, Robert de Massey and William de la Ferte Massey. Others list two legitimate sons, Baron Mathieu de la Ferte Mace and Hugue de Macey, plus Hamon as an illegitimate son.”
William de La Ferté Macé was the only French noble family holding land within Normandy (A Norse-occupied territory of France, of which William the Conqueror was Duke). The Barons of Massey were fair and well respected in England, but their ancestors in France were a brutal family respected more for their violent disposition than their titles.
William married Miss < > de Conteville, [stepmother of Hamon],5 daughter of Herluin de Conteville, Viscount of Conteville, Count of Crespon and Harlette de Falaise, in 1058 in Normandy, France. < was born from about 1037 to 1041 in Conteville, Normandy, France. Other names for < were Miss (Muriel?) de Conteville Burgh and Muriel de Montaigne.
Research Notes: The “Miss de Conteville” in several sources may have been Muriel de Conteville.
Per Wikipedia (Herluin de Conteville) one of Muriel’s sisters could have been married to William, lord of La Ferte -Mace instead of Muriel. If Muriel, aka Muriel de Montaigne, Muriel de Conteville. More ancestry on Muriel may be available.

Children from this marriage were:

+ 2 M i. Hamon de Massey, 1st Baron de Dunham 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 was born before 1056 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England and died in 1101 in Dunham, Lancaster, Lancashire, England. (Relationship to Father: Biological, Relationship to Mother: Step)

+ 3 M ii. Baron Mathieu de la Ferté Macé 13 was born after 1058 and died about 1075 in Normandy, France.

+ 4 M iii. William de la Ferté-Macé, Baron of La Ferté-Macé 14 was born about 1059. (Relationship to Father: Biological, Relationship to Mother: Step)

+ 5 M iv. Sir Hugue de Macey 14 died about 1100 in <Normandy, (France)>.

+ 6 F v. Margaret de la Ferté-Macé .14

Second Generation

2. Hamon de Massey, 1st Baron de Dunham 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 (William (Viscount)1) was born before 1056 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England and died in 1101 in Dunham, Lancaster, Lancashire, England. Other names for Hamon were Haimo de Masci, Hamo de Mascy Baron de Dunham, Hamon I De Mascy 1st Baron of Massey, and Hammon I Massey Baron of Dunham Massey.
Research Notes: Illegitmate son of William de la Ferte-Macé per most sources.
The first Hamon de Massey was the owner of the manors of Agden , Baguley , Bowdon , Dunham , Hale and Little Bollington after the Norman conquest of England in 1066, taking over from the Saxon thegn Aelfward according to the Domesday Book .[1]
The name of Hamon de Massey was passed on to his descendants for several generations. There are several different ways of spelling the name, including “de Masci”, “de Mace”, “de Macei”, “de Mascy”, “de Massy” and “de Massey
The Chester to York Roman road passes between the settlements of Dunham Massey and Bowdon and today forms the boundary between the two places. The name Dunham is derived from the Anglo-Saxon dun, meaning hill. The Massey element of the name is a result of its ownership by the Massey Barons. The manor of Dunham is recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as having belonged to the Saxon thegn Aelfward before the Norman Conquest and to Hamo de Masci after. De Masci was an influential baron, who also had control over the manors of Baguley , Bowdon , Hale , Partington , and Timperley . The addition of “Massey” to the name Dunham reflects the manor’s importance within the barony; Dunham was the seat of the Masseys. The importance of Dunham is further emphasised by the presence of two of de Massey’s castles: Dunham Castle and Watch Hill Castle on the border with Bowdon; a third, Ullerwood Castle , was near Hale. The Masseys remained barons of Dunham and its environs until the 14th century, when the line became extinct.
Bramall Hall
Bramall Hall is a Tudor manor house in Bramhall , within the Metropolitan Borough of Stockport , Greater Manchester, England. It is a timber-framed building, the oldest parts of which date from the 14th century, with later additions from the 16th and 19th centuries. The house, which functions as a museum, and its 70 acres (28 ha) of landscaped parkland with lakes, woodland, and gardens are open to the public.

Dating back to Anglo-Saxon England , the manor of Bramall was first described in the Domesday Book in 1086, when it was held by the Masseys. From the late 14th century it was owned by the Davenports who built the present house, and remained lords of the manor for about 500 years before selling the estate of nearly 2,000 acres in 1877 to the Manchester Freeholders’ Company, a property company formed expressly for the purpose of exploiting the estate’s potential for residential building development. The Hall and a residual park of over 50 acres was sold on by the Freeholders (though not the lordship of the manor) to the Nevill family of successful industrialists. In 1925 it was purchased by John Henry Davies , and then, in 1935, acquired by the local government authority for the area – Hazel Grove and Bramhall Urban District Council. Bramall Hall is owned now, following local government reorganisation in 1974, by Stockport Metropolitan Borough Council (SMBC), which describes it as “the most prestigious and historically significant building in the Conservation Area”.
The name “Bramall” means “nook of land where broom grows” and is derived from the Old English noun br meaning broom , a type of shrub common in the area, and the Old English noun halh, which has several meanings – including nook, secret place and valley – that could refer to Bramall.[2] The manor of Bramall dates from the Anglo-Saxon period , when it was held as two separate estates owned by the Anglo-Saxon freemen Brun and Hacun.[3] The manor was devastated during William the Conqueror ‘s Harrying of the North .[4] After William subdued the north-west of England, the land was divided among his followers and Bramall was given to Hamon de Massey in around 1070.[3]
The earliest reference to Bramhall was recorded in the Domesday Book as “Bramale” at which time the manor was part of the Hamestan Hundred in Cheshire. With Cheadle and Norbury , Bramall was one of three places described in the Domesday Book that today lie within the modern-day Metropolitan Borough of Stockport .[1] Whereas its value was 32 shillings before 1066, it was worth only 5 shillings by 1086.
In the first part of the 12th century, the manor passed from the second Baron of Dunham Massey to Matthew de Bromale. According to Dean, Matthew’s father is said to have founded the de Bromale family, naming himself after the manor, and he may have been related to or a follower of the de Masseys. He may have also held the manor at some point. The de Bromales held the manor until 1370 when Alice de Bromale married John de Davenport , and the family name was changed.-
Genealogy.com (Snell) says he was an illegitimate son (per Wyatt Massey 11/20/1999). Fought at Battle of Hastings and/or served as Mathieu’s squire. Mathieu was later killed in battle in Normandy. Hamon was the first to live at Dunham Massey and was known as the Baron de Dunham. He founded the Massey family.

Has death date as 1101 in Dunham, Lancaster, Lancashire, England.
Herman W. Snell (“Descendants of William De Belleme”) quotes from History of Cheshire, by Sir Peter Leycester
“Hamo de Mascy is thought to have been the illegitimate, or “natural” son of William de La Ferte, viscount of the powerful Belleme (Bellamy) family of Normandy. The seat of his holdings was the town of La Ferte Mace (fur-tee ma-cee) located in the present day Orne district. William’s oldest son (legitimate) was Baron Mathieu de La Ferte Mace. His youngest (legitimate) was Hugue de Macey. All three sons were present at the Battle of Hastings, 1066, and as a result were given land grants in England. At Hastings, Mathieu’s rank was Baron, Hugue’s rank was knight, and Hamo served as Mathieu’s squire. Mathieu would not live to enjoy his English possessions, as shortly after Hastings he was killed in battle in Shropshire. Hamo received his grants in Chesire and founded the Mascy (Massey) family. The seat of his holdings was the village of Dunham and his family lived at Dunham Massey Hall. His title was Baron de Dunham, and his descendants would continue to live at Dunham Massey Hall until 1458 when it came into the possession of the Booth family by marriage to a Massey heiress. In 1085 the Masseys held nine lordships in Chesire.
Dunham Massey Hall, at the time the Masseys lived in it, was a three winged manor (in the shape of a squared off U) surrounded by a moat. The extensive grounds outside the moat contained a deer park, orchards, a river, and fishing ponds. Later owners made many changes and it bears little resemblance to the old Massey homestead. It now belongs to the British National Trust and is open to the public. It is located four miles spouthwest of Altrincham, which is a suburb of Manchester. ”

Sites obtained by Hamon l, in addition the the house in Chester and land in Wirrall peninsula, were Ullerton or Owlarton. It is located approx. two miles south-southeast from the town of Knutsford. Going northwest to the Mersey River, Northeast to Bramhall or Bromhale, which is those days would have been two miles s/w from Stockport, Thence below Stockport to the Mersey River.
With these two lines denoting the s/e/ and s/w/ boundary and the Mersey River being the northern boundary of an area having a triangular shape. At about the midway point of the northern boundary on the Mersey River would be the river crossing to the City of Manchester original location in Lancaster, which lies to the north of Chester.
This probably marks the area with the greatest holdings of the Barons de Mascy in Cheshire. With these lands Hamon de Mascy had lesser Lords who held portions thereof for him or under his ‘right’. Examples would be Adae de Carrington and Alano de Tatton. Both constituted Estates granted to Hamon.
In 1092 King William Rufus was a guest at the Court of Hugh Lupus in Chester. at least two of his Barons attended the King, Hamon de Mascy and William Venables. They along with their entourage of adherents and servants of Hamon’s, accompanied the King on a hunting expedition in the Wirrall Peninsula. This probably took place on lands which had been set aside as a hunting preserve of the King and treated as his possession, which had not been the subject of a grant, not even to Earl Hugh Lupus. No doubt it was a consequence of some occurrence on this hunting expedition that a new estate was given to Hamon I, in fee of Hugh Lupus.
Pontington, the area which is called today the village of Puddington,was granted by the King him self, so that there after the
de Mascy Cheshire Barons held it in fee of the King rather than in fee of the Earl. For that reason Pontington was in later years especially prized.One can only speculate why King William Rufus made this generous grant. However, as soon as the hunting party returned to Hugh Lupus’ Castle at Chester, Hamon sought out a scrivener, possibly a Monk whoes duties were appropriate to the purpose of recording as follows:

“I, William, King of England do give onto Mascy all my right, interest and title to the hop and hopland(valley land) from me and mine with bow and arrow, when I shoot upon yerrow(the place), and in witness to the sooth(action or statement) I seal with my wang tooth.”

Inscribed as witness was William Venables “fratre suo”. In the consideration given to the first Hamon de Mascy it should be remembered that he was a part of the court and governing body of nobles in Cheshire at a time when it was a county Palatinate under Earl Hugh Lupus. What this means is, that it’s rule was like that under a country under martial law. At least Earl Hugh Lupus was not hampered by either King William the Conqueror or King William Rufus and he reigned in Cheshire as King. The Barons and their Lords were almost constantly put to defend against the Welsh on Cheshire’s western border and to maintain control over the Saxons who made up the bulk of the population.

Hamon Massey, the first Baron of Dunham-Massy, held the towns of Dunham,Bowden, Hale, Ashley and half of Owlerton in Bucklow Hundred, under Hugh Lupus, Earl of Cheshire in the reign of William the Conqueror. All of which one Edward held formerly, as appears by Domesday Book.So it appears this Edward was dispossessed of his right herein and these lands given to Hamon by Hugh Lupus. Hamon also had land in Maxfield Hundred,Bromhale and Puddington in Wirrall Hundred and other places, at the same time.

[FN:From the History of Cheshire, by Sir Peter Leycester:
After the conquest the Saxons were ejected and their lands were granted to Normans. BRAMALE (Bramhall) was granted to HAIMO (Hamo, Hamon) DE MASCI (Mascy, Massey &c) as part of the barony of Dunham Massey, the the Macclesfield Hundred. It is linked historically with Brunhala = Bromhale = Broomhall near Wrenbury and Nantwich, through the family of Hamo de Masci, the first baron.

Noted events in his life were:

• Received: Bramall (Bromale), Abt 1070, Bramhall, Cheshire, England. From Wikipedia – Bramall Hall:
The manor was devastated during William the Conqueror ‘s Harrying of the North .[4] After William subdued the north-west of England, the land was divided among his followers and Bramall was given to Hamon de Massey in around 1070.[3]

The earliest reference to Bramhall was recorded in the Domesday Book as “Bramale” at which time the manor was part of the Hamestan Hundred in Cheshire. With Cheadle and Norbury , Bramall was one of three places described in the Domesday Book that today lie within the modern-day Metropolitan Borough of Stockport .[1] Whereas its value was 32 shillings before 1066, it was worth only 5 shillings by 1086.[5]

In the first part of the 12th century, the manor passed from the second Baron of Dunham Massey to Matthew de Bromale. According to Dean, Matthew’s father is said to have founded the de Bromale family, naming himself after the manor, and he may have been related to or a follower of the de Masseys. He may have also held the manor at some point. The de Bromales held the manor until 1370 when Alice de Bromale married John de Davenport , and the family name was changed.[4]

Hamon married Margaret Sacie, daughter of Le Sire De Sacie, about 1099 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England. Margaret was born about 1077 in Dunham, Lancaster, Lancashire, England.
Children from this marriage were:
+ 7 M i. Robert de Mascy 16 was born after 1098 and died after 1124.
+ 8 M ii. Hamon II Massey 17 was born about 1100 in Cheadle, Cheshire, England and died about 1140 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England about age 40.

3. Baron Mathieu de la Ferté Macé 13 (William (Viscount)1) was born after 1058 and died about 1075 in Normandy, France.
Death Notes: Died in Battle

Research Notes: Legit son 1 of 2
Fought in battle of Hastings, plus Hamon (illegitimate) possibly as his squire. Mathieu killed in battle in Normandy.

4. William de la Ferté-Macé, Baron of La Ferté-Macé 14 (William (Viscount)1) was born about 1059. Another name for William was Guillaume de la Ferté-Macé Baron of Ferté Macé.

5. Sir Hugue de Macey 14 (William (Viscount)1) died about 1100 in <Normandy, (France)>.
Research Notes: Legitimate son 2 of 2

Fought in Battle of Hastings. After Mathieu was killed in battle in Normandy, Hugue became the heir and head of the household. He founded the Marcy family.

6. Margaret de la Ferté-Macé 14 (William (Viscount)1).
Margaret married Ranulphus de Praers.12
Third Generation

7. Robert de Mascy 16 (Hamon de, 1st Baron de Dunham2, William (Viscount)1) was born after 1098 and died after 1124.
Research Notes: From A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland, Part II, p. 986 “MASSEY.”

SIR WILLIAM MASSEY, Knt., 16 HENRY III, son of WILLIAM MASSEY, of Tatton, grandson of ROBERT MASSEY, of Sale, and great-grandson of ROBERT MASSEY, living anno 1124, who was son of HAMON MASSEY, 1st Baron of Dunham Massey, temp. WILLIAM the Conqueror, m. Margaret, dau. and co-heir of Humphrey Rosthorne, of Rosthorne, and was father of
8. Hamon II Massey 17 (Hamon de, 1st Baron de Dunham2, William (Viscount)1) was born about 1100 in Cheadle, Cheshire, England and died about 1140 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England about age 40.
Research Notes: From A History of Altrincham and Bowdon, p. 9:

“The second Hamon had issue Hamon, a son and heir, and Robert Massey, from whom sprang the Masseys of Sale. This is probably the Hamon Massey who is noticed in one of the ancient chronicles as having held the Castle of Dunham against Henry II. in 1173, during the rebellion of which Hugh Earl of Chester was principal leader. He gave the lands of Bramhall, or Bromale, to Matthew de Bromale by charter…”

Hamon married Eleanor Beaumont about 1124 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England. Eleanor was born about 1100 in Cheshire, England.

Research Notes: FamilySearch? Rootsweb? AFN: 18GS-7K2

Children from this marriage were:

+ 10 M i. John Massey was born about 1127 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England.

+ 11 M ii. Hamon III Massey 19 20 was born about 1129 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England and died about 1216 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England about age 87.

+ 12 M iii. Robert Massey was born about 1130 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England.

Fourth Generation

9. Robert Massey, of Sale (Robert de7, Hamon de, 1st Baron de Dunham2, William (Viscount)1).
Research Notes: Source: A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland by Sir Bernard Burke, Part II (London, 1863), p. 986 “MASSEY”

Robert married someone.
His child was:

+ 13 M i. William Massey, of Tatton .

10. John Massey (Hamon II8, Hamon de, 1st Baron de Dunham2, William (Viscount)1) was born about 1127 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England.
Research Notes: From History of Altrincham and Bowdon, p. 10:
“[The third Hamon] is said to have given to his brother John Massey all the land of Moreton.”

11. Hamon III Massey 19 20 (Hamon II8, Hamon de, 1st Baron de Dunham2, William (Viscount)1) was born about 1129 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England and died about 1216 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England about age 87. Another name for Hamon was Hamo de Masci [III].
Death Notes: Per History of Altrincham and Bowdon, p. 10, “He died about the end of the reign of King John, or the beginning of that of Henry III., and his wife Agatha survived him.”
BRAMHALL (Maccles.or Masceys field) The third baron of Dunham (in Henry II = 1154-89) confirmed to Mathew de Bromale: “the manors of Bramall, Duckenfield and 11 parts of Baggiley which had been previoulsy held by his father, whose name is not mentioned but who was probably youunger son of near kinsman of Hamo deMasci, the Norman Grantee”. (Ormerod p 823). Then, in 6 Edwd I (=1272-1307) “Richard de Bromhall obtained release (ie. exemption) for himself and his tenants in Bromhall, Duckenfield and 11 parts of Baguley (sic) from Hamon de Massey, for being impleaded in the courts of Dunham.

Hamon married Agatha de Theray.22
The child from this marriage was:

+ 14 M i. Hamon IV Massey 23 was born about 1176 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England and died after 1250 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England.

12. Robert Massey (Hamon II8, Hamon de, 1st Baron de Dunham2, William (Viscount)1) was born about 1130 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England.

Fifth Generation

13. William Massey, of Tatton (Robert, of Sale9, Robert de7, Hamon de, 1st Baron de Dunham2, William (Viscount)1).
Research Notes: Source: A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland by Sir Bernard Burke, Part II (London, 1863), p. 986 “MASSEY.”

William married someone.
His child was:

+ 15 M i. Sir William Massey .16

14. Hamon IV Massey 23 (Hamon III11, Hamon II8, Hamon de, 1st Baron de Dunham2, William (Viscount)1) was born about 1176 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England and died after 1250 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England.
Research Notes: From History of Altrincham and Bowdon, pp. 11-12:
“Hamon, the fourth baron, was, like his father, liberaly disposed towards the Church, and gave to the Priory of Birkenhead, which was founded by his father, the advowson and donation of the church of Bowdon, as also half an acre of land in Dunham…”

Hamon married someone.
His children were:

+ 16 M i. Hamon V Massey 25 26 was born about 1212 in Dunham Massey, Bucklow, Cheshire, England and died after 1278.

+ 17 M ii. William Massey .26

+ 18 F iii. Margery Massey .26

__ SL8.IT for Blackberry See More

LIST OF MANUSCRIPT MUNIMENTS CONCERNING SIR WILLIAM DE BAGGELEGH AND DESCENDANTS (Held at John Rylands Library)

B 133 TW Tatton of Wythenshawe Muniments 1275/6-c.1870 Finding aid compiled by Robert Fawtier, Frank Taylor and John Hodgson. 2nd edition The John Rylands University Library 150 Deansgate Manchester M3 3EH England tel.: +44 (0)161-275 3764 fax: +44 (0)161-834 5574 © The John Rylands University Library, The University of Manchester 2011 2011 Finding aid originally encoded in EAD v.1 by the Access to Archives project team at The National Archives, rekeying from the original printed handlists, in 2002. Finding aid written in English. August 2011 1. Finding aid converted from EAD v.1 to EAD 2002 and re-edited by John Hodgson, Collections and Research Support Manager (Manuscripts, Archives and Visual Collections), using Oxygen XML Editor v.12. TW Tatton of Wythenshawe Muniments 1275/6-c.1870 Tatton family of Wythenshawe, Cheshire 11.6 linear metres; 1500 items. The University of Manchester, The John Rylands University Library English Immediate Source of Acquisition The archive was donated to the John Rylands Library by Colonel Robert Henry Grenville Tatton in 1953; he had originally deposited the material at the Library in 1925. Subsequent accessions were made in 1960 and 1962. TW/1499-1500 were deposited in the John Rylands Library by Colonel R.H.G. Tatton personally on 28 February 1949. Scope and Content A collection of medieval charters, deeds, leases, estate papers and correspondence of the Tatton family of Wythenshawe, Cheshire. Documents relate chiefly to lands in Cheshire, particularly to Wythenshawe, Northenden, Northen Etchells and Stockport Etchells in Stockport parish, and to Macclesfield, with smaller numbers concerning Aldford, Altrincham, Bowdon, Bredbury, Godley, Great Warford, Hale, Kenworthy, Knutsford, Pownall Fee, Romiley and Werneth, and a handful bearing on properties in Derbyshire, Flintshire, Lancashire and Nottinghamshire. In addition there are seventeenth-century letters and personal papers of the Tatton family, which include invaluable material relating to the Civil War in Cheshire. Robert Tatton (1606-1669) was a staunch royalist, who withstood a siege by parliamentary forces for three months in 1642-3. Administrative History The Tattons are one of the oldest families in Cheshire, and their estates have the distinction of being one of the very few in the extensive hundred of Macclesfield which remained in the same family from as early as the fourteenth century to the present century. Wythenshawe itself was granted to Robert de Tatton in 1370 following his marriage to Alice, daughter and heiress of William de Massey. The Tattons held property in Wythenshawe, Northenden and Etchells in Stockport parish, and in Macclesfield, as well as Altrincham, High Legh, Knutsford, Bowdon, Bredbury and Romiley. Robert Tatton (1606-1669) was a staunch royalist during the Civil War, who sustained a siege against parliamentary forces. The family were related to another important gentry family in the area, the Egertons, following the marriage of William Tatton (1703-1776) to Hester Egerton, daughter of John Egerton of Tatton in 1747 (she was his second wife). Their son, William (1749-1806), assumed the surname and arms of Egerton of Tatton. He employed Lewis Wyatt to extend the original Elizabethan Hall in the 1790s, with the construction of a library on the ground floor. He was four times married, and succeeded by his eldest surviving son, Wilbraham Egerton (1781-1856), who took possession of the Egerton estates, while the Wythenshawe property passed to his second son, Thomas William Egerton (1783-1827). On succeeding to this estate, Thomas assumed the surname Tatton. Thomas Egerton Tatton was married to Emma, daughter of the Hon. John Grey, the third son of Harry Grey, 4th Earl of Stamford, of Dunham Massey. In 1926 their great-grandson, Robert Henry Grenville Tatton (1883-1962), sold Wythenshawe Hall and 250 acres of surrounding land to Ernest Simon and his wife Shena, who donated it to Manchester Corporation (Manchester Guardian, 13 April 1926, p. 13). The Hall was opened to the public in May 1930 (op. cit., 29 May 1930, p. 13). In 1926, after several years of discussion and despite the opposition of some ratepayers and other local authorities, the Corporation purchased the Wythenshawe Estate for working-class housing, at a cost of over £200,000 (op. cit., 22 October 1926, p. 13). In 1931 a private Act of Parliament incorporated the area into the city. System of Arrangement The system of arrangement devised by Robert Fawtier when first cataloguing the collection has been adherred to. The documents are numbered consecutively, TW/1-1500. Preferred Citation Tatton of Wythenshawe Muniments, TW/62 [etc.], John Rylands University Library, The University of Manchester. Restrictions on Access The collection is open to any accredited reader. Restrictions on Use Photocopies and photographic copies of material in the archive can be supplied for private study purposes only, depending on the condition of the documents. Prior written permission must be obtained from the Library for publication or reproduction of any material within the archive. Please contact the Head of Special Collections, John Rylands University Library, 150 Deansgate, Manchester, M3 3EH. Other Finding Aids The original typescript handlist was produced by Robert Fawtier (as far as TW/1178) and Frank Taylor (TW/1179-1500). Related Materials The Library also holds part of the Egerton of Tatton muniments (ref.: GB 133 EGT). Bibliography The charters were communicated by T.W. Tatton, esq., to J.P. Earwaker, for his East Cheshire: past and present (London, 1877), 2 vols (see vol. 1, p. xxv). The charters concerning Great Warford were communicated (in transcript, so it seems) by T.W. Tatton, esq., to Thomas Helsby, editor of the revised edition of George Ormerod’s History of the county palatine and city of Chester (London, 1882), 3 vols (see vol. 3, p. 584). Index Terms Tatton family of Wythenshawe, Cheshire Egerton family of Tatton, Cheshire Wythenshawe, Cheshire Cheshire, England TW/1 Quitclaim (Northenden) n.d. Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Quitclaim by Margaret, the daughter of Roger de Tatton and Elene, to Robert de Tatton and his heirs. Witness list: ‘Hiis testibus Willelmo de Bagyle, Roberto de Sale, Rogero de Kemerithe, Hanrico Venatoris, Ricardo de Kegg[wort], Hanrico Capellano et aliis.’ TW/2 Grant (Northenden) n.d. Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by Robert de Tatton, to Roger, son of William, son of Roger de Tatton. Witness list: ‘Hiis testibus Willelmo de Bagyle, Roberto de Sale, Rogero de Kemerithey, Roberto fratre suo, Hanrico filios(?) Venatoris, Ricardo de Keggewort, domino Hanrico Capellano et aliis.’ TW/3 Quitclaim (Northenden) n.d. Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Quitclaim by Roger, son of William, son of Roger de Tatton, to Robert de Tatton and his heirs. Witness list: ‘Hiis testibus: Willelmo de Bagyl, Roberto le Massy de Sale, Rogero de Kemerithey, Hanrico Venatoris, Ricardo de Keggewort, Hanrico Capellano et aliis.’ TW/4 Grant and quitclaim (Northenden, Kenworthy and Wythenshawe) n.d. Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant and quitclaim by Cecilia de Northwurthen to Richard, the son of Master Richard de Keggewurthe of her land in Northenden, Kenworthy and Wythenshawe. Witness list: ‘Hiis testibus dominis Roberto de Stokeport, Galfrido de Shedle, Thoma de Orreby, Rogero de Daveneport, Willelmo de Bagileg, Ricardo de Orreby, Petro de Daveneport, Thoma fratre suo, Henrico de Bircheles, Johanne de Mottrum, Ricardo de Wurch et multis aliis.’ TW/5 Grant (Northenden) n.d. Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by Margaret, the daughter of Liolf to Adam, son of Thomas de Sharston. Witness list: ‘Hiis testibus Willelmo de Baggelegh, Rogero de Kenverthey, Adam de Kemerithey, Henrico Venatore, Roberto de Kemerithey et multis aliis.’ TW/6 Grant (Northenden) n.d. Sealing: 2 seals, missing. Grant by Simon [de Whitechurch], Abbot of St Werburgh of Chester, and the said Abbey to Robert de Mascy of the half of Northenden at a rent of 8s a year. Witness list: ‘Hiis testibus Radulpho de Meidnillwaring, Roberto filio Pig, Patricio de Modburleie, Willelmo filio Dunning, Herberto de Pulford, Petro Clerico, Ankitello de Abbatia, Magistro Hugone, Ricardo de Rodeston, clerico, et multis aliis.’ TW/7 Grant (Northenden) n.d. Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by Simon [de Whitechurch], Abbot of St Werburgh of Chester, and the said Abbey to Robert de Mascy of the half of Northenden at a rent of 8s a year. Witness list: ‘Hiis testibus Radulpho de Meidnillwaring, Roberto filio Pig, Patricio de Modburleie, Willelmo filio Dunning, Herberto de Pulford, Petro Clerico, Ankitello de Abbatia, Magistro Hugone, Ricardo de Rodeston, clerico, et multis aliis.’ Another copy of TW/6 above. TW/8 Quitclaim (Northenden) n.d. Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Quitclaim by Henry Wolreche of the land ‘que fuit Ricardi Fraunceys’. Witness list: ‘Hiis testibus Willelmo de Karynton, Roberto de Massi de Sale, Roberto de Tatton, Henrico le Hunter, et multis aliis.’ TW/9 Grant and quitclaim (Northenden) 19 Mar 1281/2 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant and quitclaim by Hamo le Hunter of Northenden to William de Baggelegh. TW/10 Grant (Northenden) 1297 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by Thomas de Aketone to Henry Maynard, his wife, children and assignees, of a messuage and lands for twenty years beginning at Martinmas Day 1297. Witness list: ‘Hiis testibus Roberto de Tattone, Ricardo de Brom, Ricardo de Brom, Ricardo de Kegwurth, Hamone Venatore, Adam de Kenentone clerico et aliis.’ TW/11 Grant (Northenden) 22 Feb 1310/1 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by Adam son of Hamon de Northwrthyn [Northenden] to Henry, his brother. TW/12 Grant (Northenden) 16 Jan 1312/3 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by Hamo le Hunter to William the Miller [Molendinario]. TW/13 Bond (Northenden) 17 Jun 1313 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Bond from Hamon de Kenewrthy to William de Baggley for the sum of 40s. TW/14 Grant (Northenden) 21 Feb 1316/7 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by Thomas de Aketon to Gaufrey, the son of William de Baggelegh. TW/15 Grant (Northenden) 16 May 1316 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by Thomas de Aketon to Gaufrey, the son of William de Baggelegh. TW/16 Grant (Northenden) 26 Apr 1317 Sealing: 1 seal in white wax, entirely defaced. Grant by Roger the son of Hamon de Keneworthey to Gaufrey the son of William de Baggelegh. TW/17 Grant (Northenden) 19 Jul 1316 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by Thomas de Mascy staying in Whitenshaw to his son William of land in Wythenshawe in the “ville” of Northenden. TW/18 Grant (Northenden) 19 Jul 1316 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by Thomas de Mascy staying in Whitenshaw to his son William. TW/19 Quitclaim (Northenden) 6 Aug 1316 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Quitclaim by Thomas de Mascy staying at Whitenshaw to William de Baggelegh. TW/20 Grant (Northenden) 6 Oct 1316 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by Henry, the son of Hamon de Northworthin [Northenden] to Gaufrey, the son of William de Baggelegh. TW/21 Grant (Northenden) 17 Oct 1316 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by Robert, son of Thomas de Mascy, to William, his brother. TW/22 Grant (Northenden) 8 Feb 1318/9 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by Hamo le Hunter of Northenden to Gaufrey, the son of Sir William de Baggelegh, knight. TW/23 Grant (Benchill and Haveley Hey [Northen Etchells]) 28 Nov 1318 Sealing: 2 seals, missing. Grant by Nicholas de Eton and Jane, his wife, to William de Baggylegh, knight, and his heirs. TW/24 Grant (Northenden) 16 Jan 1319/20 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by Robert de Tatton to Geoffrey, the son of William de Baggelegh, knight. TW/25 Agreement (Longley in Northenden) 1322 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. An agreement between Thomas de Aketon and Amaria, Lady of Bagguley, concerning the grant by the former to the latter of some land in Longeleye for forty years to begin on 11 November 1322. TW/26 Quitclaim (Northenden) 21 Jun 1332 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Quitclaim by Mathilda, the widow of Henry, son of Hamon de Nortwourhym, to William de Baggelegh, knight. TW/27 Grant (Northenden) 24 Feb 1334/5 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by William de Baggelegh, knight, to John Marshall of lands in Northenden, Kenworthy, Stockport, Newton in Longdendale, Mottram in Longdendale, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Northwich. TW/28 Grant (Northenden) 31 Aug 1348 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by William, the son of Thomas de Mascy, of Wythenshawe to William, his son, and Margery, the latter’s wife. TW/29 Grant (Northenden) 17 Apr 1370 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by Alicia, the daughter of William de Mascy of Wythenshawe, to Robert Tatton of Kenworthy of all her lands in Wythenshawe. TW/30 Quitclaim (Northenden) 17 Apr 1370 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Quitclaim by Alicia, the daughter of William de Mascy of Wythenshawe, to Robert Tatton of Kenworthy. TW/31 Grant (Northenden) 9 Aug 1375 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by Robert de Tatton of Kenworthy to Robert Bukhard, chaplain. TW/32 Grant (Tatton and Sale) 5 Jul 1383 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by Jane, the daughter of Robert de Lymme, to John le Serjaunt, vicar of Leyland (Lancashire), and Robert del Culmylache. TW/33 Grant (Northenden) 22 Feb 1396/7 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by John, the son of Robert de Legh, to Margaret, the wife of Robert de Melver and the widow of Robert de Tatton, junior. TW/34 Judgement (Northenden) 26 Mar 1396 Sealing: 2 seals, missing. The judgment of the umpires William de Clayton, John de Chorlay, Thomas de Chedell and William del Brok, touching the lands of Robert de Meller and Thomas de Tatton, the son of Robert de Tatton. TW/35 Confirmation of grant (Northenden) 25 Jun 1401 Sealing: 1 seal in red wax, shield or, 3 lozenges azur. Confirmation by James de Bagylegh, parson of Stockport, of his grant to Robert de Legh, knight, of lands in Wythenshawe and Northenden. TW/36 Grant (Northenden) 14 Jan 1402/3 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by Robert de Legh, knight, to James de Bagylegh, parson of Stockport. ‘Datum apud Northerdene, die Sabbati in festo Sancti Hillarii, anno regni Regis Henrici quarti post conquestum Anglie tertio.’ [The date is wrong. The third year of King Henry IV was 30 September 1401 – 29 September 1402. St Hilary’s day is 13 January, and in 1402 13 January fell on a Friday. We must therefore correct ‘die Sabbati in festo’ to ‘die Sabbati post festum’.] TW/37 Grant (Northenden) 21 Jul 1404 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by Jane, the daughter of Richard de Broume, to William le Hunt[er] and John the son of Gaufrey Rudson. TW/38 Exchange (Northenden) 3 Feb 1415/6 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Exchange of lands between William de Tatton, of the one part, and William le Hunte and Margaret, his wife, of the other part. ‘Datum apud Norworthyn, die dominica in festo Purificationis beate Marie, anno regni Regis Henrici quinti post conquestum secundo.’ [The date is wrong. The second year of King Henry V was 21 March 1414 – 20 March 1415. The feast of the Purification of Our Lady is 2 February; 2 February 1415 was a Saturday. We must correct ‘die dominica in festo’ to ‘die dominica post festum’.] TW/39 Testimonials (Northenden) n.d. [c.1430] Sealing: 2 seals, missing; 2 seals, imperfect and defaced. Testimonials of Gefrone de Legh of Etchells, John Wilkinson, priest of Northenden, William the Hunt of Northenden, and Hugh of Shelton of Northenden, touching the attachment of Barlow were. TW/40 Recognizance (Northenden) 7 Aug 1431 Recognisance in Assize against John de Barlowe of Barlow, Richard de Hyll of Northenden and Elene, the widow of Robert de Hyll of Northenden. TW/41 Lease for years (Northenden) 18 Apr 1451 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Lease for twenty years from James Massy, esq., to Richard Hyll, gent. TW/42 Release and quitclaim (Northenden and Kenworthy) 5 Apr 1476 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Release and quitclaim by William Hyll, the son of Richard Hyll, to Roger Savage, the son of John Savage, sen., knight. TW/43 Release and quitclaim (Northenden and Kenworthy) 27 May 1476 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Release and quitclaim by William Hill, to Roger Savage, the son of John Savage, sen., knight. TW/44 Grant (Northenden and Kenworthy) 28 May 1476 Sealing: 2 seals in red wax, defaced. Grant by Robert and Hamond Hyll, the sons of William Hyll, to Roger Savage, brother of John Savage, sen., knight. TW/45 Declaration (Northenden) 2 Jun 1476 Sealing: 4 seals in red wax (three imperfect or defaced, one with a T); 3 seals missing. Declaration of legal ownership of land by William Hyll. TW/46 Agreement (Northenden) 16 Jul 1477 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. An agreement between Ellyn, late wife of Richard Hill, and Roger Savage, esq. TW/47 Receipt 8 Sep 1477 Sealing: 1 seal in red wax, imperfect. Receipt by William Hill for a sum of 5 marcs sterling from Roger Savage. TW/48 Grant (Northenden) 25 Feb 1482/3 Sealing: 1 seal in red wax, ‘A dog passant before a little tree’. Grant by Thomas Tatton, the son of Peter Tatton, to William Tatton, the son of Robert Tatton. TW/49 Counterpart grant (Northenden) 25 Feb 1482/3 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Counterpart of grant TW/48 above. TW/50 Grant (Northenden and Baguley) 11 Aug 1489 Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by John Hall, rector of the parish of Northenden, to Thomas Assheton, knight, Ralph Longley, rector of the church of Prestwich, William Both [Booth], the son of George Bothe [Booth], esq., Robert Chaunterell, William Dogge of Stockport and Dennis Elys, chaplain, of lands in Northenden and Baguley. TW/51 Grant (Northenden) 20 Apr 1494 Sealing: 2 seals, missing. Grant by Robert Tatton and his son William, to Robert Vawdre and his son Thomas. TW/52 Sale (Northenden) 10 Jan 1498/9 Sealing: 1 seal in brown wax, defaced. Sale by James Chauntrell of Northenden to William Tatton of Chester. TW/53 Grant (Manton, Nottinghamshire) n.d. Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by William Fitz-Arthur to St Cuthbert of Retford. Witness list: ‘His testibus: Rogero dicto filio Ilberti, Ilberto Clerico, Matheo, Nicholao Ingeniatore, Waltero portario et pluribus alis.’ TW/54 Grant (Morton, Nottinghamshire) n.d. Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant and quitclaim by Ammanius de Thormtum to Richard Le Locifer. Witness list: ‘Hiis testibus: Willelmo de Capiltum, Ammanio de Lechemtum, Henrico de Cariltum, Jacobo de Pultum, Johanne de eadem et aliis.’ TW/55 Grant (Clumber, Nottinghamshire) n.d. Sealing: 2 seals, missing. Grant by Andrew de Riparia and Dyonisia, his wife, to Newstead Priory [in Sherwood, Nottinghamshire]. Witness list: ‘Hiis testibus: Alexandro de Dreyt[one], Roberto filio Ricardi de Hesel, Rogero de Anneleya, Petro de Clumbre, Adam de Heytun, Willelmo filio Huberti de Hayt[un] et aliis.’ TW/56 Grant (Clumber, Nottinghamshire) n.d. Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by Dyonisia, the widow of Andrew de la Riviere of Revetona, to Felicia, her daughter and the latter’s heirs, on condition that she and they shall pay a rent to the Church of St Cuthbert in Worksop. Witness list: ‘Hiis testibus: Rogero de Osbertona, Waltero de Gayteford, Thoma de eadem, Willelmo castellano de Osbertona, Ada de Grave, Richardo de Cellario, Ada janitore, servientibus priorie de Wyrkesope?.’ TW/57 Grant (Clumber, Nottinghamshire) n.d. Sealing: 1 seal, missing. Grant by Dyonysia, the daughter of Alan, Castelain of Revetona to the priory of Newstead in Sherwood. Witness list: ‘Hiis testibus: Henrico, tunc rectore ecclesie de Waltringham, Ricardo de Levisham, Thoma de Deneby, Henrico de Grave, Roberto Drury, Roberto de la Riviere, Willelmo et Alano fratribus ejusdem Roberti.’ TW/58 Grant (Clumber, Nottinghamshire) n.d. Sealing: 2 seals, missing. Grant by Adam, the son of Stephen, chaplain of Hayton, and Felicia, the former’s wife, to William de Walesby. Witness list: ‘Hiis testibus: Rogero de Osbertona, Willelmo Castelain, Waltero de Gayteford, Thomas de Gayteford et aliis.’ TW/59 Grant and quitclaim (Clumber, Nottinghamshire) n.d. Sealing: 2 seals, missing. Grant and quitclaim by Adam, son of Stephen de Roeytone, chaplain, and Felicia, his wife, to the Prior and Convent of Newstead in Sherwood.
__ SL8.IT for Blackberry
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JUST HOW OLD IS BAGULEY HALL

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The Great Hall was built in 1320c, but you may not be aware that people have lived on the site for possibly thousands of years. Excavated in 1976 were a couple of Neolithic Axe Heads suggesting possible use as early as 2,500bc – The same period that saw the building of Stonehenge, Avebury Stone Circle and Silbury Hill.

What you probably aren’t aware of is that there are TWO scheduled ancient monuments around The Hall and Environs – The Hall itself and the now disappeared Baguley Barrow (which was criminally built over in the 1990’s and now lies, flattened, under someone’s back garden on Nethercote Avenue) I’d like to speak to the person who gave the go ahead for this and explain to them what a Scheduled Ancient Monument is!

Archaeologists suggested this may have been a Bronze Age Windmill or a burial chamber. It was Anglo Saxon tradition to build feasting halls around these ancient barrows so the Hall which occupied the site before the current structure may well have originated in the 6th or 7th centuries. Its not too far a leap to suggest that this barrow could be the original Tata’s Tun or settlement around a barrow which gave its name to the Tatton family of later generations.

So, current literature states that Baguley Hall is built on the site of a previous 11th or 12th century hall. It would appear that this hall itself was built on a much earlier hall and that on top of much earlier settlements going back 3-4,000 years

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KINDLY LETTER OF SUPPORT FROM PROFESSOR MICHAEL WOOD

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Dear Mat

Just got back to London tonight having been in M/c since Sunday doing some talks for the Manchester Histories Festival-one of which by a strange coincidence included a section about the hall with pictures! Just discovered your site and read about your project-it sounds terrific ,much needed after all these years –and very timely .

I make history films and write about historical subjects, esp medieval,(I was originally an Anglo-Saxonist) and I have been fascinated by the hall since I was a kid. We moved from Moss Side to Wythenshawe in 1955 and my mum and dad lived in Paulden Avenue for more than 30 years. I remember the hall before the metal box (I could see it from my bedroom window!) , when there were fears at least at one point that the building might not survive(6 or 7000 local people signed a petition to save it from demolition in the late sixties) , and then of course during the years of the box: I once got a look inside and we frequently snooped around it when we were kids. When we were little, our wonderful head at Benchill primary school, Mr Thomas, was very interested in the history of the area and talked about it, along with the story of the “Saxon burials’ at Saxfield! .

Anyway, in addition to my day job, (we are a small documentary film company) I am now visiting Prof in Public History at Manchester University, so come up to M/c fairly frequently (I live in London now, having left M/c for work in 1985, though I kept my flat in Didsbury till the mid nineties). If there is any way that you think I could help the project I’d be really happy to do so. Initially it might have to be simply a matter of lending my name to help publicize the project- of course, if you felt that were any use to you- as I am working on a series of films in China and am regularly travelling there, so life is a bit full and I haven t got much chance of doing anything active just for now as I havent got much spare time. So I cant promise too much till after october. But I’d be game, eg, to do a fundraising talk in M/c -in town, or in Wythenshawe, or both,- at some point in the future if you all thought that was worth doing; and in the meantime, even if it were in a small way, I’d be glad to help. Its a really fascinating building which should be much better known, and which you cant help but feel could still play a role in enriching the life of the community.
So at least, please add me to the list of Friends!!

And very best of luck with the project!

All the best
Michael Wood